Man sands – berry head – brixham harbour

This was a tough trek!, I was itching to get out this morning, knowing full well that the weather wasn’t going to be great down here in the south west of England.

I woke up and kept an eye on the dark skies and how quickly they were passing over, I do read local weather reports but they are not always accurate, as they test off the centre of the city… so after an hour of inspection, I figured ‘why not?!’ I don’t mind getting wet, I Just know from experience, that along the coastal paths the terrain can be very slippery and wary during the heavy rain.

To all that are thinking about this walk, I would only complete the whole circular if your reasonably fit and steady on your feet, this is because the footpath from Man sands to berry head is steep, rough and hard on the legs.

If you would like an easier and more disabled friendly walk but still get the incredible views, I would recommend parking at berry head or in brixham itself and complete the loop around berry head and down into brixham harbour for a spot of coffee… this will become more clearer throughout this post…

For today’s adventure, I parked at Man sands national trust car park, I tend to use National trust, as I am a member which allows me free parking and entry to places, but also if your not a member, for the smaller car parks like this one, it’s a £2 contribution for a whole day (bargain!!).

Kingswear, Dartmouth, TQ6 0EF

Above is the address to enter into a sat nav.

When driving to this car park, don’t be alarmed when you take the long country roads as you think you are driving into the middle of no where… it feels like that, but along this country road you will eventually come to sign posts and of course the car park.

Once you have reached the car park, bearing in mind there is no facilities, exit out the lower gate and walk down the pathway sign posted Man Sands beach… this path is about half a mile long, with a steep,unsurfaced track, but once you reach the end of this track, you enter into a lovely secluded cove with a sandy beach which allows dogs all year around. When I reached this beach I could have poured myself a coffee and stayed there all day! But I set myself a challenge and so I was determined to complete it 💪….

Man sands beach..

The picture doesn’t do this beach any justice at all!! Especially with the cloudy dull skies 🤣….

After exploring the beach I followed the coastal path up towards berry head… now from this beach, it is a very, very steep hill up to the top of the cliff, but if you love a challenge, I recommend it! Once you reach the top, the cool sea air hits your face and there is a bench to perch on so you can take in the breath taking views of Man sands below…. I was in complete awe and the silence was just numb founding!

Top of Man sands – south down cliff

Even on a dull day, that coastal edge looks fantastic….

Congratulations, the worst part is over!!

You have reached the highest point, so it is only fairly uneven paths and steady trails from here on…

for the next two miles along the coastal path, you will see some incredible wildlife and ultimate peace until you arrive at berry head.

The path to berry head

Berry Head.

Hey good going for getting this far!

Berry head is a headland on the far out reach of Torbay, it is a nature reserve with its iconic lighthouse and Napoleonic forts.

This nature reserve is a lovely day out for everyone as the pathways and car park are all disabled and dog friendly.

There is a spectacular little cafe here called the guardhouse café. So if you would like a little stroll, with a coffee this place is perfect.

The reviews for this café, have been noted. And I can tell you that the Bacon sandwich is mouthwatering! But whatever your taste they have a lovely selection.

Berry head lighthouse

This lighthouse that is on the edge of the nature reserve, is the smallest light house in Great Britain and is still active to this day.

As you continue along the coastal path, you finally start to reach some civilisation… the beautiful harbour town of Brixham.

This is a small town, with quirky shops and markets to fill your boots with local produce..

I didn’t spend much time here unfortunately, as I had to get to work but I will be back in the next few months to have a look at the town and it’s history.

As you follow the harbour, you will come to the famous ship that is moored in brixham itself, called the Golden Hind.

This shop is a museum in which you can have a little wander around, and is a replica of the famous Sir Francis Drake’s ship.

Sir Drake renamed the ship the Golden Hind in 1578 after his patron Sir Christopher Hatton, whose crest was a golden ‘hind’.. in other terms a red deer. The ship was originally called the Pelican and served as a very successful ship to the British heritage.

The Golden Hind replica based at Brixham Harbour.

On a much nicer day than today, I would recommend sitting on the edge of the harbour with a cup of coffee (loads of choice along the harbour front) and people watch as they bustle their way through the local market.

Well we are near the end now…. a final walk through Brixham town, (along country roads), and up the steepish hill towards Kingswear.

We reach the end of the path which leads again to Man sands… this is the perfect opportunity to enjoy the sea, before returning to your car.

Luckily for me I brought a flask, and so it was the perfect opportunity to crack this open and celebrate one tough trek… but a worthy one at that!

My footprints leaving Man Sands

My worthy cup of tea ☕️

The complete circular walk 🌄🥾❤️….

I hope you enjoy this trek as much as I did!

Happy hiking 🥾

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